Mon, Sep 13 | Online Event

Yes to Life No to Mining event on the social engineering of extraction.

Tickets Are Not on Sale
Yes to Life No to Mining event on the social engineering of extraction.

Time & Location

Sep 13, 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Online Event

About the Event

Register for the Zoom meeting HERE

Meeting ID: 830 4710 5090

Passcode: 147404

On September 13th the Yes to Life No to Mining network will host an event on how mining companies engage in social engineering to push their projects forwards.

The event is based on a recently published special issue in Political Geography on Engineering extraction and land control: Examining political (re)actions 'from above'

See full details below;

The Social Engineering of Extractivism

September 13th. 2-4pm UTC.

How does a mining project move beyond plans, blueprints and permits to become a gigantic hole in the Earth?

In this YLNM seminar, Alexander and Judith will discuss their new special issue in Political Geography: Engineering extraction and land control: Examining political (re)actions 'from above'*, with support from contributors Andrea Brock and Amber Huff.A lot of digging and physical re-engineering of the Earth is involved, but Dr Alexander Dunlap and Dr Judith Verweijen argue that the making also involves a great deal of social engineering.

Judith and Alexander will trace the evolution of the industry's social engineering technologies and techniques, relating them to histories of colonialism, wars of decolonization, neo-liberalism and the ‘green’ economy. Andrea and Amber will present their research in England and Madagascar before opening up the panel for wider discussion that is the main focus of their presentations.

Speakers

Andrea Brock is a Lecturer at the University of Sussex who researches, cares about and engages with environmental conflicts, (green) extractivism, corporate power, state violence, solidarity and mutual aid

Amber Huff is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Development Studies. Her work looks at the politics of conservation, resource struggles and conflict, environmental policy and rural livelihoods.

Judith Verweijen is a Lecturer at the University of Sheffield. She focuses on the militarization of conflicts related to natural resources, including large-scale mining and nature conservation, in zones of armed conflict.

Alexander Dunlap is based at the Centre for Development and the Environment, UiO. His work has critically examined police-military transformations, market-based conservation, wind energy development and extractive projects more generally with coal mining in Germany and copper mining in Peru.

(*https://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/political-geography/special-issue/10QG3QVC47G)

Political Geography | Engineering extraction and land control: Examining political (re)actions 'from above' (J. Verweijen & A. Dunlap, convenors) | ScienceDirect.com by Elsevier

www.sciencedirect.com

Read the latest articles of Political Geography at ScienceDirect.com, Elsevier’s leading platform of peer-reviewed scholarly literature

Share This Event